Monthly Archives: January 2017

#NYSCASuccess: How The Corning Museum of Glass Became a Destination

Courtesy of the Corning Museum of Glass

Nestled in the Southern Finger Lakes, The Corning Museum of Glass collection covers 3,500 years of history and includes nearly 50,000 objects from around the world. In one room, you may see ancient Roman mold-blown glass, and, in another, a pink, serpentine chandelier by Dale Chihuly. You can walk past a floor-to-ceiling Baccarat crystal sculpture and listen to 19th century musical instruments made of glass. And, you can try your hand at glassblowing– or, if you’re flame-shy, just watch a demonstration.

CMoG attracts more than 460,000 visitors each year – more than 40 times the town of Corning’s population of 11,000. Nearly 40 percent are international visitors.

With its unique offerings, high standards of stewardship, and inviting programs, CMoG has become New York State’s most visited art museum outside of New York City – and 30th in the country. CMoG’s local impact is also broad, from its support of 200 employees to its advocacy of regional campgrounds, hotels, and B&Bs. Beyond the collection, the museum’s Studio has welcomed thousands of students, artists, and visitors, and its Rakow Research Library is a leading global resource on the art, history, science and technology of glass.

We spoke with President and Executive Director Karol Wight about how the museum cultivates its standing as an international cultural tourism attraction –and an economic driver in its region.

“The museum, Studio and Rakow Library enable us to be the most comprehensive place in the world to view glass, research glass, experience glass being made, and to make your own glass,” said Wight.

Founded in 1951 by Corning Glass Works (now Corning Incorporated) in celebration of the company’s 100th anniversary, the museum is not a company showcase but a nonprofit with vast offerings, financed by a mix of contributions, grants, program revenue, and investments.

“Glass is a compelling topic, and the phrase we hear most frequently from our visitors once they’ve arrived is ‘I had no idea…’ But…If our displays and demonstrations were not high quality, we wouldn’t see so many visitors,” Wight said.

cmog-30cmog-29cmog-25cmog-24cmog-19cmog-18cmog-17cmog-16cmog-13cmog-9cmog-6cmog-2

CMoG has continually grown, challenges notwithstanding. In 1972, the museum faced a flood that filled the walls with five feet of water, after which staff accomplished major restoration work. By 1980, new elevated galleries had been constructed. A further $65 million expansion took place in 1996 to hold an increasing number of visitors. A contemporary gallery and hot shop for glassmaking were added in 2015.

In addition to careful attention to its collection, exhibitions, and programs, CMoG works to grow its following through extensive outreach, both locally and internationally. To build its community, the museum hosts a series of “2300°” events, six times a year (November to March and May) with demonstrations, live music, and regional fare.

According to Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Beth Duane, CMoG also works to attract its crowd in unconventional ways – like partnering with Watkins Glen International raceway and creating a glass trophy for the NASCAR race held there. In addition, sales employees and artists travel throughout the country and internationally to give presentations and demonstrations, including outreach on Celebrity Cruises.

Keeping with the museum’s focus on innovative ways to engage with and share glass, this year, CMoG will launch GlassBarge, a project in conjunction with the Erie Canal Bicentennial that will bring glassmaking to towns along New York’s waterways. The project is supported by NYSCA’s Regional Economic Development Council Program. NYSCA also receives General Operating Support through NYSCA’s Museum Program.

As audiences and program offerings have grown, so has CMoG’s budget. According to the most recent 990s filed, between fiscal years 2010 and 2014, the company saw a $7 million increase in contributions and a $4 million increase in income – providing room to explore new possibilities.

“We are an ambitious institution that has always wanted to grow and exceed our expectations,” said Wight. “We will be 75 years old in 2026, and this is a significant date in the museum’s history, one that will enable us to examine what we’ve achieved in that time frame.”

Wight looks to a 10-15 year strategic plan to focus the museum around goals of strengthening its mission and pushing boundaries of what it can do to “Tell the World About Glass.” Yet she is already thinking beyond that time frame:

“We will begin to think ahead to what else we might do, how else we might expand, and what’s missing from our message…One of our goals is to constantly reinvent ourselves to identify new ways to educate and serve the needs of those who see Corning as the go-to place for all things related to glass.”



Slideshow photos: Maestrale, Toots Zynsky; The White Necklace, JeanMichel Othoniel; Carrona, Javier Perez; Lynx After a Sketchbook Page by Albrecht Durer, Marta Klonowska; Still Life with Two Plums, Flora C. Mace and Joey Kirkpatrick; Nocturne 5, Karen LaMonte; It’s Raining Knives, Silvia Levenson; Erbium Chandelier, Dale Chihuly; Glass Harmonica, Bohemia, probably made by C.T. Pohl; Three Horns (late 16th-17th century); Cityscape, Jay Musler


Do you have a #NYSCASuccess story to share? Let us know in the comments or at public.affairs@arts.ny.gov.

 

NYSCA in the News

This week, NYSCA grantees celebrate anniversaries, legacies and new beginnings, and new upcoming events are announced.

Four-month festival to celebrate legacy of Frank Lloyd Wright

Buffalo News

“Buffalo is throwing Frank Lloyd Wright a birthday party for the ages. Starting on June 8, the 150th anniversary of Wright’s birth, the newly formed Buffalo Arts & Crafts Alliance will launch a four-month celebration of Wright’s work and Buffalo’s undersung role in the Arts & Crafts Movement. The festival, which will feature exhibitions and events in the Burchfield Penney Art Center, the Darwin Martin House, Roycroft Campus and the University at Buffalo’s School of Architecture and Design, will culminate in a four day conference slated for Oct. 20 to 21. Jonathan Katz, one of the alliance’s co-founders and organizer of the celebration, said it is an attempt to remind people about Buffalo’s central place in the legacy of American architecture and design and to reclaim its history as an incubator for one of the most important and wide-reaching aesthetic movements in American history.” NYSCA supports Burchfield Penney through our Museum, Electronic Media & Film, and Regional Economic Development Council Progrmas; and the Roycroft Campus and the Darwin Martin House through our Architecture + Design Program.

The little opera company that could, and did, makes The Bronx sing

New York Post

“When someone mentions The Bronx, you don’t necessarily think ‘opera!’ Yet native son Michael Spierman has been trying to change that since 1967 when…he started his company there. This weekend, the curtain rises on the Bronx Opera’s 97th production, Ralph Vaughan Williams’ “Sir John in Love.” Like every BxO production, it will be sung in English and given on the cheap: The top ticket price is $45 — up from $1, which is what the company charged for its first opera, Mozart’s ‘Così Fan Tutte.’ Then again, that was 50 years ago, when the company sang at a housing project. Since then, corporations have chipped in, some alumni have moved on to the Met and the BxO’s performed for local school kids and at halls all over the tri-state area. But its mission hasn’t changed: As Spierman sees it, opera should be accessible to all.” NYSCA supports Bronx Opera through our Music Program.

Buffalo History Museum – Restore, Reactivate, Reconnect

Buffalo Rising

“The [Buffalo History Museum] is 80% of the way towards reaching its $1.43 million goal, which will allow the Buffalo landmark to move forward with significant infrastructure upgrades. The first of those upgrades is to restore 2600 square feet of space under the building’s portico that has not been open to the public for nearly three decades. Not only will this be valuable space for exhibits and events, it will also help to reconnect the museum to the Olmsted park. Doors and windows will be replaced, revealing natural light and an additional access point. The project is being called Restore, Reactivate, Reconnect.” NYSCA supports the Buffalo History Museum through our Museum Program.

See Lady Gaga’s ‘Flying Dress’ at the Intrepid Museum’s Drone Exhibit

DNAInfo

“Drones, model airplanes and the world’s first “flying dress” will be on display at a new exhibit heading to the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum.“Drones: Is the Sky the Limit?” examines the history of drone technology — “from its modern-day origins in World War I and its military development to its current applications in solving complex humanitarian challenges,” the museum said. The exhibit will open inside a pavilion on Pier 86, at West 46th Street, on May 10… Visitors will be able to fly a virtual drone, as well as take in drone-captured images and video footage as part of an immersive theater experience. A flying dress once worn by Lady Gaga and a door-to-door delivery drone prototype will also be on display.” NYSCA supports the Intrepid through our Museum Program.

Carnegie Hall’s 2017-18 season features festival on 1960s

News 10

“Carnegie Hall’s 2017-18 season will be highlighted by “The ’60s: The Years that Changed America,” a festival that Pulitzer Prize-winning author Robert A. Caro helped program. David Crosby and Snarky Puppy have a program on the nexus of music, protest and social change on Jan. 25, Carnegie said Wednesday. Composer Ray Chew will lead a “Sounds of Change” concert with artists from rock, folk, rock, soul and rhythm and blues on Feb. 5. The Kronos Quartet on Jan. 19 premieres two compositions commissioned by Carnegie Hall: Zachary J. Watkins’ inspired by the moment before Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech and Stacy Garrop’s on words of author Studs Terkel. The festival will be held at venues throughout New York from January to March 2018 and will include the Museum of Modern Art, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, the Apollo Theater, City Center, the New York Public Library and other organizations. Carnegie’s season starts Oct. 4 with a celebration of the 100th anniversary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth in August 1918.” NYSCA supports Carnegie Hall through our Music, Presenting, and Individual Artists Programs.

 

Guidelines at a Glance: Facilities

The NYSCA staff works hard to ensure that our grant guidelines are as thorough as possible, answering crucial questions that may come up during the application period and providing step-by-step instructions with photos to ease the process. However, we recognize that it may be useful to have a quick overview of what kinds of projects are eligible in each category, in addition to the full guidelines.

For this purpose, we have created Guidelines-at-a-Glance. Every day for the next three weeks, we will share one entry summarizing one of the 15 NYSCA Programs open for application. At the end of this period, we will also share a document compiling all the Guidelines-at-a-Glance. In addition to eligible projects listed, programs except Facilities and Individual Artists offer General Operating Support.

Today, we focus on Facilities:

Facilities (Prerequistite: applicants must have received three consecutive years of funding from NYSCA to be eligible, and must own their facility or hold a long-term lease with at least six unexpired years at the time of application. Grants of $5,000-$49,500 represent up to 50% of a project’s cost, and applicants may not include other NYS funds in project budget.)

  1. Capital Equipment
      1. Purchase of equipment that is essential to the production and/or presentation of an art form, such as theatrical lighting/sound systems, gallery lighting, sprung flooring, infrared or FM listening systems, large-type and Braille printers, theatre seats, projectors, fire curtains, museum collections storage systems.

     

  2. Ineligible: non-depreciable audiovisual equipment, office furniture/shelving, stackable chairs, distance learning equipment, food service equipment, telephones.
  3. Computers are eligible if the equipment is critical to producing an art form and is not for administrative use.
  4. Capital Projects ( construction must occur during NYSCA contract period)
    1. Includes renovation, expansion, or restoration projects for eligible buildings
    2. Includes installation of elevators, wheelchair lifts, boilers, and HVAC systems
    3. Support in this category is not available for the construction of entirely new facilities.
  5. Design Studies by NYS licensed architect
  6. Supports concept design, schematic design, design development for a planned capital project; master plan for cultural facility
  7. NYSCA encourages design work that generates creative solutions to the problem of adapting existing structures to new or expanded cultural uses.
  8. Projects in this category may not include: bid negotiation, construction administration, purchase of real estate, capital construction costs, out-of-state travel, salaries or overhead of public agencies, or student projects.

 

Guidelines at a Glance: Dance

NIGHT CREATURE
Choreography: Alvin Ailey
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
Credit Photo: Paul Kolnik

The NYSCA staff works hard to ensure that our grant guidelines are as thorough as possible, answering crucial questions that may come up during the application period and providing step-by-step instructions with photos to ease the process. However, we recognize that it may be useful to have a quick overview of what kinds of projects are eligible in each category, in addition to the full guidelines.

For this purpose, we have created Guidelines-at-a-Glance. Every day for the next three weeks, we will share one entry summarizing one of the 15 NYSCA Programs open for application. At the end of this period, we will also share a document compiling all the Guidelines-at-a-Glance. In addition to eligible projects listed, programs except Facilities and Individual Artists offer General Operating Support.

Today, we focus on Dance:

General Operating Support

  • The primary focus or mission of the organization must be in the Dance discipline
  • GOS represents serves as an investment by NYSCA in an organization’s ongoing work and is not restricted to a specific project or program
  • Funding is directed to organizations that demonstrate exemplary practice in all areas of administration, finance, programming, and other organizational activities

Professional Performances

  • New York State-based professional dance companies may request support for a performance series or season (minimum of 2 full performances) in the company’s home base
  • Funding is directed primarily towards dancers’ and other artistic salaries or fees
  • A dance company must have produced at least 2 home seasons in the last 3 years in order to be eligible
  • Organizations applying for or receiving General Operating Support from Dance are not eligible for funding in this project support category
  • Professional Performances category accepts sponsored requests.
  • NYS based choreographers and dance companies are able to seek support for a home season   through a nonprofit umbrella organization.
    • The sponsor entity must meet all the requirements and qualifications for application to NYSCA
    • The dance artist/company must also meet the prerequisites and requirements of the Professional Performances category
    • A completed Sponsored Request Form is required as part of the submitted support material along with proof of NYS residency

Rehearsal Space and Residencies

* This category encompasses two specific project areas: Support for Subsidized Rehearsal Space     and Long-Term Artists Residencies within New York State

* Rehearsal Space and Long-Term Artists Residencies are exempted from the Council-wide 2 request limit

Rehearsal Space

  • Supports organizations that provide subsidized rehearsal space and studio rental to dance groups and choreographers
  • Organizations must provide subsidized space at $10/hour or less to dance groups and individual choreographers
  • A minimum of 1,000 subsidized hours must be provided. This support is intended to fund creative rehearsal time and excludes auditions, classes, workshops and showings
  • Funding in this category is intended to assist outside artists and companies and does not support the studio space given to the applicant’s resident artists

Long-Term Residencies in New York State

  • Supports artists’ fees and some administrative costs for a 3-to-6 week residency by a NYS-based dance company in a targeted area outside NYC
  • The residency must be of consecutive weeks and take place in a location in NYS that is not within a company’s home county
  • The applicant dance company must have received support from the Dance program within the last 2 years.

Services to the Field

  • Support is directed to service organizations that offer professional services for the advancement of dance groups and individuals
  • Services may include technical assistance in administrative and/or new technological areas, cooperative management, and performance spaces
  • Organizations applying for or receiving General Operating Support from Dance are not eligible for funding in this project support category

Regrants & Partnerships

* This category is by invitation of the Council only and designed to support special initiatives and services. This category is exempt from the Council-wide 2 request limit.

Dance Commissions

* This support is available under the Individual Artist program and is exempt from the Council-wide 2 request limit.

Dance Commissions provides support for New York State-based professional dance companies to bring in a guest choreographer or for venues of 199 seats or less that have a prior NYSCA funding history for a professional presenting series and regularly present dance.

Guidelines at a Glance: Arts Education

Students construct a project at the Salvadori Center, a NYSCA grantee that receives support for its programs melding architecture, arts, math, and science.

The NYSCA staff works hard to ensure that our grant guidelines are as thorough as possible, answering crucial questions that may come up during the application period and providing step-by-step instructions with photos to ease the process. However, we recognize that it may be useful to have a quick overview of what kinds of projects are eligible in each category, in addition to the full guidelines.

For this purpose, we have created Guidelines-at-a-Glance. Every day for the next three weeks, we will share one entry summarizing one of the 15 NYSCA Programs open for application. At the end of this period, we will also share a document compiling all the Guidelines-at-a-Glance. In addition to eligible projects listed, programs except Facilities and Individual Artists offer General Operating Support.

Today, we focus on Arts Education:

Arts Education

  1. Project Support- Community Based Learning
    • For children, adults, families, intergenerational
    • Funding for sequential arts workshops, classes, and training, with a minimum of eight consecutive sessions.
    • Classes and workshops can be offered by arts organizations or community-based, non-arts organizations offering arts activities to the public in partnership with artists and arts groups with sequential arts learning as a primary goal
    • Does not support training of professional artists
  2. Project Support- K-12 In-School Programs
    • Funds organizations that work in partnership with public schools
    • Supports collaborative projects that bring teaching and resident artists into the school for sequential workshops of at least six consecutive sessions.
    • Cultural organizations must apply with an educational partner such as (a) school/s, a district, or a BOCES.
    • Support cannot be used to fund the salary, training or professional development of public school teachers, or to fund the activities of parent-teacher organizations
  3. Services to the Field
    • Supports projects of statewide/ regional scope, which support the development of the field.
    • Must focus on: 1. Building the capacity of cultural organizations and the field to engage in arts education and lifelong learning partnerships; or, 2. Improving the practice and knowledge base of the arts education field

Governor Cuomo Announces Over $41 Million for Cultural and Arts Organizations

Lincoln Center, New York City
Photo credit: Iñaki Vinaixa for Lincoln Center

Over 1,200 Organizations Across New York Receive Grants for Arts Programs

Funding Includes Arts Career Development Fellowships for Underserved Communities

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced $41.26 million for cultural and arts organizations throughout the state. The grants were awarded to 1,230 organizations to support the creation of visual, performing, literary, and media arts, as well as arts education, economic development through the arts, and cultural programs for underserved populations.

“These grants reinforce New York’s role as a global cultural destination, promote learning for all ages, cultivate creativity, and build community,” Governor Cuomo said. “From world-renowned cultural centers like Carnegie Hall to high quality public art programs, in-school arts education, and free performances, New York is a hub of cultural activity and artistic talent, and we must ensure that art is accessible to all New Yorkers.”

New York State Council on the Arts grants are awarded in 16 programs in all of New York’s 62 counties. A full list of grantees is available here.

The regional funding breakdown is below:

Region

FY17 Grants

New York City

$24,626,627

Long Island

$1,065,503

Mid-Hudson

$2,981,566

Capital Region

$3,737,672

North Country

$1,132,485

Mohawk Valley

$566,600

Central New York

$1,498,838

Southern Tier

$1,736,602

Finger Lakes

$1,780,442

Western New York

$2,134,340

Total

$41,260,675

 

 

This year’s awardees include:

  • The Public Theater, which is currently developing a new Stephen Sondheim-David Ives musical, “Buñuel.”
  • The Rochester Fringe Festival to present more than 500 performances by theatre groups, musicians, comedians and dancers in 25+ indoor and outdoor venues
  • Just Buffalo Literary Center, which partners with Buffalo Public Schools to teach creative writing and brings world-renowned authors to Western New York
  • Sculpture Space in Utica to host 20 artists from around the world to create new community-based work
  • New York City Center for free performances at the Delacorte Theatre to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Fall for Dance, and to present an annual flamenco festival
  • The Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville for a virtual reality initiatives and for Minds in Motion, which teaches students to make animated films
  • The Museum of the Moving Image in Queens, which holds a collection of 130,000 artifacts hosts screenings and exhibitions of interactive and digital media
  • Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, which cultivates folk traditions and regional culture in the North Country

 
Three grant opportunities through the Regional Economic Development Council Program are new this year: initiatives devoted to the Erie Canal Bicentennial, initiatives devoted to the Women’s Suffrage Centennial, and Arts Career Development Fellowships for Underserved Communities.
 
New York State Council on the Arts Chair Dr. Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel said, “NYSCA support enables New York State to maintain and advance its role as a global cultural center. Our grantees represent the high quality and diversity of artists and arts organizations from the North Country to the Southern Tier. From preservation of historic architecture to digital media innovations to our new fellowship devoted to promoting inclusion, our goal is to empower our artists and arts organizations to realize their potential and inspire our constituents.”

New York State Council on the Arts Executive Director Mara Manus said, “NYSCA’s FY2017 grants not only provide crucial support for the arts throughout New York State but also demonstrate our commitment to fulfilling the economic and community needs of our constituents through the arts. Through our funding programs, convenings, communications, and new initiatives, we look forward to deepening our role as a vital resource for our grantees and the public in 2017 and beyond.”

About The New York State Council on the Arts

The New York State Council on the Arts champions community and creativity by preserving and advancing numerous aspects of the cultural heritage that makes New York State an exceptional place to live, work and visit. These aims are primarily achieved through the agency’s grant-making activity. Annually, the agency awards $41 Million to more than 1,200 organizations statewide.

The projects, artists and organizations NYSCA supports underscore the diversity and scope of the State’s residents and visitors. From New York City’s landmarks to traditional artisans in the North Country, from international dance companies to teaching artists in inner-city schools, the impact of the agency’s funding can be seen in each of the State’s 62 counties. Annually, NYSCA’s funding helps to engage new audiences, drive artistic excellence and innovation introduce children to the arts, build organizational capacity and support our State’s organizations.

Created by Governor Nelson Rockefeller in 1960, and continued and expanded to the present day with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, NYSCA is an agency of the Executive Branch of the New York State Government. For more information on NYSCA, please visit: www.arts.ny.gov.

Guidelines at a Glance: Architecture + Design

The Van Alen Institute’s LES Decoded. Photo by Zachary Tyler Newton. The Van Alen Institute received support for multiple FY17 projects and its public program series.

The NYSCA staff works hard to ensure that our grant guidelines are as thorough as possible, answering crucial questions that may come up during the application period and providing step-by-step instructions with photos to ease the process. However, we recognize that it may be useful to have a quick overview of what kinds of projects are eligible in each category, in addition to the full guidelines.

For this purpose, we have created Guidelines-at-a-Glance. Every day for the next three weeks, we will share one entry summarizing one of the 15 NYSCA Programs open for application. At the end of this period, we will also share a document compiling all the Guidelines-at-a-Glance. In addition to eligible projects listed, programs except Facilities and Individual Artists offer General Operating Support.

Today, we focus on Architecture + Design:

Architecture + Design
The Program supports the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, historic preservation, graphic, fashion, industrial and/or interior design.

  1. Project Support
    • Examples include: exhibitions, publications, workshops, conferences, public programs, services to the field
    • Restoration/Maintenance/Construction projects are not eligible. (Please see the Facilities Program for capital support)
    • Recent awards range from $5,000 – $27,000; not more than 50% of project budget
  2. Independent Projects
    • Individuals (or a team) may apply for a project which advances their field and contributes to a broader understanding of design.
    • Requests must be sponsored by an eligible New York State nonprofit organization – NYSCA cannot grant to individuals directly.
    • Grants are awarded up to $10,750.

 

 

DATES ADDED: Individual Artist Application Sessions

Third World Newsreel will be co-hosting a NYSCA Individual Artist Program (IND) Application Session in Manhattan on February 8, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m, and Women Make Movies will be hosting an IND Application Session at their office in Manhattan on February 9, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

The session will focus on opportunities for NYS individual artists in electronic media (video, sound art, installations, and new technologies) and film production. NYSCA funding supports Documentary and Narrative works, Interactive/Digital Technology, Sound Art, Installations/Performance, Experimental Work, Animation and Radio. Projects can be a combination of media, including but not limited to, work for tape, installation, single-channel work, or interactive disc formats. Artists at various career stages are welcome to apply. Grant amounts range from $5,000 to $25,000. Documentary projects must be in the post-production phase and all applicants must have proof of New York State residency.

Arian Blanco, Program Director for the Individual Artists program at the New York State Council on the Arts will go over the application and the requirements.

For guideline info, make sure to visit NYSCA’s website.

More information about the TWN session is available here, and more about the WMM session is here.


 

 

 

 

NYSCA in the News

This week, NYSCA grantees celebrate new and renovated buildings, and museums host unusual projects.

Renovating a Saratoga landmark: Lena’s gets $2M makeover

Leader Herald

“Bob Dylan would surely still recognize the low-ceilinged room in Caffe Lena where he played a couple of gigs almost 60 years ago. But just about everything else about a venue that bills itself as the nation’s oldest continuously operating coffeehouse has undergone some major upgrades as part of a $2 million renovation project bankrolled in part by folk music performers themselves… Bonacio Construction has put $500,000 into the renovation project, including installing an elevator that will make Caffe Lena fully accessible to the disabled. A campaign has raised another $1 million. Caffe Lena is still raising the final $500,000 for the upgrades, scheduled to be completed this spring.” Caffe Lena first opened in May 1960, and its roster has included Dave Van Ronk, Joan Baez, Don McClean and Arlo Guthrie, who is honorary chairman of the coffeehouse’s fundraising campaign. NYSCA supports Caffe Lena through our Presenting and Facilities Programs.

 

A.R.T./New York Theatres Celebrate Opening Jan. 18

Playbill

“The Alliance of Resident Theatres/New York is celebrating the official opening of the new A.R.T./New York Theatres: two state-of-the-art performances spaces located at 502 West 53rd Street. Tony winner Billy Porter and Daphne Rubin-Vega [hosted] the ribbon-cutting ceremony on January 18…The theatres, designed by Toshiko Mori, have been built to provide affordable performance space to New York City’s smaller-budget nonprofit theatres. Seating capacity is up to 87 seats in the Jeffrey and Paula Gural Theatre, and up to 149 seats in the Mezzanine Theatre. Following a 2012 study that showed theatre companies spend over 50 percent of their budgets on performance space and labor alone, A.R.T./New York has committed to subsidizing the rental rates for the selected companies to allow for more money to go towards creative development.” NYSCA supports A.R.T./New York through our Theatre and Regional Economic Development Council Programs.

Burning Calories at the Met

The New Yorker

Jogging through the Metropolitan Museum of Art to the sounds of the Bee Gees and squatting in front of a sculpture by John Singer Sargent are part of “The Museum Workout,” created by choreographer Monica Bill Barnes. “[The] workout, which premières this week for a monthlong run, constitutes an approximately two-mile path around the museum, sporadically narrated in recorded voice-overs by the author, illustrator, and museum enthusiast Maira Kalman…In her voice-overs, Kalman describes her long love affair with the Met and her relationship with the works of art there… and casually contemplates mortality, lending the experience a surprising poignancy…Dance has become a popular acquisition of museums in recent years. Immersive, participatory, and often silly, ‘The Museum Workout’ could be seen as a cheeky response to this trend. But the work also tackles serious questions that dance artists have long been asking about the relationship between artists and audiences and about what constitutes dance.” NYSCA supports the Met through our Museum and Presenting Programs and Monica Bill Barnes & Company through our Dance Program.

Vineyard Announces Recipient of Paula Vogel Playwriting Award

Playbill

“The Vineyard Theatre has announced Kate Tarker as the ninth recipient of the Off-Broadway company’s Paula Vogel Playwriting Award, named in honor of the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, and given annually to an emerging writer of ‘exceptional promise.’ Tarker will receive a cash prize and artistic development support throughout her residency. Tarker’s play Laura and the Sea was featured on the 2016 Kilroys List, was an L. Arnold Weissberger Award finalist, and Princess Grace Award finalist. The new work was also featured as part of the Vineyard’s fall reading series last year. Her work has been developed by The Lark, Ars Nova, NYTW, and The O’Neill. Previous recipients of the award include Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Rajiv Joseph, Tarell Alvin McCraney. Boo Killebrew, Clare Barron, Christopher Chen, Erika Sheffer, and Kara Lee Corthron.” NYSCA supports the Vineyard Theatre through our Theatre Program.

BPO visits black churches to grow diverse audience

Buffalo News

“It’s not unusual to hear gospel music in East Side Baptist churches…But hearing that same music coming from a Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra string quartet is a little more out of the ordinary. The BPO Diversity Council wants to change that perception. To that end, the string quartet performed three gospel songs during services Sunday at two predominantly African-American churches, Friendship Baptist and First Shiloh Baptist, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday…At Friendship Baptist, the choir and every member of the congregation joined in, said Otis N. Glover, co-chair of the Diversity Council. The Rev. Melody Rutherford, a Diversity Council co-chair, said it was a natural fit to reach out to gospel churches, where oftentimes worship music fills the air before the pastor speaks…This is not the first time that the BPO visited area churches. It brought in opera singer Kathleen Battle to perform spirituals from the Underground Railroad two years ago and brought in a string quartet to six churches last year.” NYSCA supports the BPO through our Music Program.

This Interactive Exhibit is Encouraging People to Crochet … to Save Coral Reefs

One Green Planet

“In 2005, twins Margaret and Christine Wertheim started Crochet Coral Reef project in California. The sisters combined their great love of the Great Barrier Reef and their passion for crocheting to create striking images that would start conversations about saving the planet’s coral reefs. The sisters have partnered with The Institute for Figuring, a group dedicated to the poetic aesthetic of science, and their artwork has been traveling the globe for over a decade. The exhibit currently resides in the Museum of Arts and Design in New York. This exhibit is not only for your viewing pleasure, patrons are invited to contribute their own handiwork to the growing ‘reef.’ Artists use hyperbolic geometry that occurs naturally in coral reefs to make their crochet-masterpieces. More than 8,000 people have participated in their crafting workshops so far.” NYSCA supports the Museum of Arts and Design through our Museum and Visual Arts Programs.

Arts Education FY18 Guidelines Webinar

Advice Magnifying Glass Words Guidance Tips Help Information Sup

Arts Education Program staff will be hosting a webinar to review FY18 application guidelines on Tuesday, January 31 at 11am. We will discuss our funding categories, eligibility criteria, and tips for successful applications. You will have the opportunity to ask questions anonymously via text.

Registration is required to attend this webinar. Please see the link below to sign up, so you will be able to call in and follow online the day of the meeting. If you cannot make that time, the meeting will be recorded and available on NYSCA’s website.

Topic: Arts Education FY18 Guidelines Webinar

Date: Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Time: 11:00 am, Eastern Standard Time (New York, GMT-05:00)

——————————————————-

To register for this meeting

——————————————————-

1. Go to https://meetny.webex.com/meetny/j.php?RGID=r03e383fff6630bf33f8005432ae0e8f8

2. Register for the meeting.

Once the host approves your request, you will receive a confirmation email with instructions for joining the meeting.

Note: If you already registered for this meeting, you do not need to register again.

To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link: https://meetny.webex.com/meetny/j.php?RGID=rc0acee1740cb67c9ddbb1498315bc4a3